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Smores donut at Federal Donuts in Philly (Taken with picplz.)

Smores donut at Federal Donuts in Philly (Taken with picplz.)

How did you hear about the last concert you attended?

I conducting a poll and could REALLY use your input! I am trying to find out how people find out about live music these days.

1. Word of Mouth

2. Venue Website

3. Facebook

4. Twitter

5. Artist Website

6. Flyer

7. Newspaper

8. Ticketing Website (ie. ticketmaster, livenation, ticketfly, etc.)

9. Events website (Zvents, Eventful, etc.)

10. Yelp

11. HearTheScene ;)

12. Other?

You can just respond with a number or if you want, elaborate. This information will be super-helpful to me.

Thanks guys! 

Check out my new site www.feistie.com. It’s gonna be great. User driven, event listing and review site. This is just a landing page with a mailing list signup, but please drop me your email address so I can let you know when the site launches!

Check out my new site www.feistie.com. It’s gonna be great. User driven, event listing and review site. This is just a landing page with a mailing list signup, but please drop me your email address so I can let you know when the site launches!

What DJ nights do you goto in Philly???

We have found it somewhat difficult to stay on top of the ever-changing DJ night list for Philly at www.hearthescene.com. Where do you guys go? I know we are missing a lot, but what nights? what venues? what DJ’s??  I have yet to find a really good resource for DJ night listings ever since the City Paper stopped giving a fuck if the shows they list actually exist or not.  Check out what we’ve got listed by clicking the DJ Nights tab.

Gracias Amigos

You can email me at Patrick@HearTheScene.com if you so choose.

@dinnerandasuit
Dinner and a Suit is playing Saturday at the North Star Bar! They are originally from Philly and back in town for one night only, so get there.
Here’s their bio, I found it here but I’m not sure where it originated from:
Dinner and a Suit is a young band whose explosive and energetic stage performance coupled with their solid lyrical and melodic hooks give them their signature sound and separate them from other bands within the alternative pop/rock genre. It’s a fresh and exciting sound with unique structure and brilliance that is unheard of at such a young age. Emerging from the Philly/South Jersey area(Now relocated to Nashville, TN), the band finds inspiration from artists such as Coldplay, Sleeping at Last, Mark Kozeleck, and Sigur Ros. Dinner and a Suit released their first album “Light and Lungs” in January 2008, and has since, hit the road, gathered local attention and fans, with no end in sight. 

@dinnerandasuit

Dinner and a Suit is playing Saturday at the North Star Bar! They are originally from Philly and back in town for one night only, so get there.

Here’s their bio, I found it here but I’m not sure where it originated from:

Dinner and a Suit is a young band whose explosive and energetic stage performance coupled with their solid lyrical and melodic hooks give them their signature sound and separate them from other bands within the alternative pop/rock genre. It’s a fresh and exciting sound with unique structure and brilliance that is unheard of at such a young age. Emerging from the Philly/South Jersey area(Now relocated to Nashville, TN), the band finds inspiration from artists such as Coldplay, Sleeping at Last, Mark Kozeleck, and Sigur Ros. Dinner and a Suit released their first album “Light and Lungs” in January 2008, and has since, hit the road, gathered local attention and fans, with no end in sight. 

Tony Bennett is performing on Friday at the Academy of Music. This is probably one of your last chances to see this legendary singer.


Tony Bennett (born Anthony Dominick Benedetto; August 3, 1926) is an American singer of popular music, standards, show tunes, and jazz.
Raised in New York City, Bennett began singing at an early age. He fought in the final stages of World War II as an infantryman with the U.S. Army in the European Theatre. Afterwards, he developed his singing technique, signed with Columbia Records, and had his first number one popular song with “Because of You" in 1951. Several top hits such as "Rags to Riches" followed in the early 1950s. Bennett then further refined his approach to encompass jazz singing. He reached an artistic peak in the late 1950s with albums such as The Beat of My Heart and Basie Swings, Bennett Sings. In 1962, Bennett recorded his signature song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”. His career and his personal life then suffered an extended downturn during the height of the rock music era.
Bennett staged a remarkable comeback in the late 1980s and 1990s, putting out gold record albums again and expanding his audience to the MTV Generation while keeping his musical style intact. He remains a popular and critically praised recording artist and concert performer in the 2000s. Bennett has won fifteen Grammy Awards, two Emmy Awards, been named an NEA Jazz Master and a Kennedy Center Honoree. He has sold over 50 million records worldwide. Bennett is also a serious and accomplished painter, creating works under the name Benedetto that are on permanent public display in several institutions. He is also the founder of Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens.

 Take a listen to this Tony Bennett and Amy Winehouse duet:

Tony Bennett is performing on Friday at the Academy of Music. This is probably one of your last chances to see this legendary singer.

Tony Bennett (born Anthony Dominick Benedetto; August 3, 1926) is an American singer of popular musicstandardsshow tunes, and jazz.

Raised in New York City, Bennett began singing at an early age. He fought in the final stages of World War II as an infantryman with the U.S. Army in the European Theatre. Afterwards, he developed his singing technique, signed with Columbia Records, and had his first number one popular song with “Because of You" in 1951. Several top hits such as "Rags to Riches" followed in the early 1950s. Bennett then further refined his approach to encompass jazz singing. He reached an artistic peak in the late 1950s with albums such as The Beat of My Heart and Basie Swings, Bennett Sings. In 1962, Bennett recorded his signature song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”. His career and his personal life then suffered an extended downturn during the height of the rock music era.

Bennett staged a remarkable comeback in the late 1980s and 1990s, putting out gold record albums again and expanding his audience to the MTV Generation while keeping his musical style intact. He remains a popular and critically praised recording artist and concert performer in the 2000s. Bennett has won fifteen Grammy Awards, two Emmy Awards, been named an NEA Jazz Master and a Kennedy Center Honoree. He has sold over 50 million records worldwide. Bennett is also a serious and accomplished painter, creating works under the name Benedetto that are on permanent public display in several institutions. He is also the founder of Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens.

 Take a listen to this Tony Bennett and Amy Winehouse duet:


A great Philly band Find Vienna has a residency at the M room in November. From their FB page:

This extremely energetic band from Philadelphia, PA is known for its clean melody lines, probing lyrics, driving rhythms and enthusiastic performances. Sweetly placed pop melodies over an alternative rock sound are sewn together to create unique, infectious songs. With the help of touring, supporting bands such as The Script, Neon Trees, Parachute, Green River Ordinance, Mae, Good Old War, online viral marketing, song placements, and radio support Find Vienna has been independently selling their EP “In Your Favorite Colors” by the thousands. The band is currently working on new songs due for release sometime in the Spring of 2011.

So make your way over to the M-room November 3rd, 10th or 17th and check these boys out.

A great Philly band Find Vienna has a residency at the M room in November. From their FB page:

This extremely energetic band from Philadelphia, PA is known for its clean melody lines, probing lyrics, driving rhythms and enthusiastic performances. Sweetly placed pop melodies over an alternative rock sound are sewn together to create unique, infectious songs. With the help of touring, supporting bands such as The Script, Neon Trees, Parachute, Green River Ordinance, Mae, Good Old War, online viral marketing, song placements, and radio support Find Vienna has been independently selling their EP “In Your Favorite Colors” by the thousands. The band is currently working on new songs due for release sometime in the Spring of 2011.

So make your way over to the M-room November 3rd, 10th or 17th and check these boys out.

Amending a great act of shame, I finally added the Kimmel Center to the venue list on HearTheScene. The first batch of shows I listed for the Kimmel Center were performances of the Philadelphia Orchestra. I am no classical music buff, but in case you guys didn’t know we have a truly world class symphony orchestra in our little city - it’s not just all cheese steaks and football here.
The Philadelphia Orchestra was started in 1900 and is considered one of the ‘Big Five’ symphony orchestras in the United States (along with New York, Boston, Chicago and Cleveland). While the ‘Big Five’ label maybe more historical than anything today, the Philadelphia Orchestra is considered one of the premier in the world. From the Orchestra’s own website www.philorch.org

Founded in 1900, The Philadelphia Orchestra has distinguished itself as one of the leading orchestras in the world through more than a century of acclaimed performances, historic international tours, best-selling recordings, and its unprecedented record of innovation in recording technologies and outreach.

Robert Cummings at allmusic.com goes even further

The Philadelphia Orchestra has been called the Rolls Royce of orchestras. Its many partisans assert that it is, and has been for nearly a century, the finest orchestra in the world.

If you’ve never seen the Philadelphia Orchestra (or most likely any symphony orchestra) and/or you’ve never been to the Kimmel Center, do yourself a favor and see one of these shows. Put on a nice shirt, pants and a tie and pretend you’ve got some class for a night! 

Amending a great act of shame, I finally added the Kimmel Center to the venue list on HearTheScene. The first batch of shows I listed for the Kimmel Center were performances of the Philadelphia Orchestra. I am no classical music buff, but in case you guys didn’t know we have a truly world class symphony orchestra in our little city - it’s not just all cheese steaks and football here.

The Philadelphia Orchestra was started in 1900 and is considered one of the ‘Big Five’ symphony orchestras in the United States (along with New York, Boston, Chicago and Cleveland). While the ‘Big Five’ label maybe more historical than anything today, the Philadelphia Orchestra is considered one of the premier in the world. From the Orchestra’s own website www.philorch.org

Founded in 1900, The Philadelphia Orchestra has distinguished itself as one of the leading orchestras in the world through more than a century of acclaimed performances, historic international tours, best-selling recordings, and its unprecedented record of innovation in recording technologies and outreach.

Robert Cummings at allmusic.com goes even further

The Philadelphia Orchestra has been called the Rolls Royce of orchestras. Its many partisans assert that it is, and has been for nearly a century, the finest orchestra in the world.

If you’ve never seen the Philadelphia Orchestra (or most likely any symphony orchestra) and/or you’ve never been to the Kimmel Center, do yourself a favor and see one of these shows. Put on a nice shirt, pants and a tie and pretend you’ve got some class for a night! 

TRITONE CLOSING, so sorry to see you go!
story via foobooz:

The local music scene got a bit of bad news over the weekend when word began trickling out that Tritone, the small music venue/neighborhood bar at 1508 South Street, was set to close. The club debuted in 2001, when current owner Dave Rogers (a veteran of Fergie’s), and his late partner, music promoter and bartender Rick Dombrowolski (who understandably went by “Rick D.”), joined forces. While a bartender at neighboring Bob & Barbara’s, Dombrowolski, who died of a heart attack in 2007, invented what has become known throughout the city as the “Citywide Special,” a can of Pabst and a shot of Jim Beam for $3.
The bar is the last of its kind. While it can be difficult for a new band to get a foot in the door at Philadelphia’s other music venues, Tritone has always had a much more open-stage policy. This resulted in a vast array of live music. From death metal to punk to singer-songwriter to hip-hop, Tritone presented it all, seven nights a week.
In my former life as a sometimes concert producer, I had the pleasure of putting together a few shows there, including an on-the-cusp Gogol Bordello, Living Color guitarist Vernon Reid, and Tune Yards mastermind Merrill Garbus, back when she was known as Fat Kid Opera. Other great performances I have seen there: Man Man, West Philadelphia Orchestra, She Haw, the Sun Ra Arkestra, Undergirl, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey and Beretta 76, just to name a few. It was also the place where I had my first deep fried pickle, not to mention my first (and last) hit of acid.
The place usually smelled like stale beer, the sound was almost always way too loud, the door guy could be a real prick, and 10 p.m. shows would start at 11 p.m or later. But when it worked, it worked, and you walked away drunk at 2 a.m. with the feeling that you had one up on all those folks who were in bed by midnight and missed the show.
No one at the bar will talk about the impending closure, but I have it on good authority that Chris and Heather Fetfatzes, who own South Philadelphia’s Hawthornes Cafe (Chris’ family owns Bella Vista Beer Distributors), have entered into an agreement of sale with Rogers, pending approval of the liquor license transfer. Expect to see one of those orange liquor license transfer signs in the window on Tuesday. The Fetfatzeses, who would not comment, are expected to dump a sizable amount of money into the dilapidated space, install draft lines, considerably raise the bar on the food program and discontinue the live music.
No word on the fate of the $3 special.
UPDATE 10/24 1 p.m.: Chris Fetfatzes, who previously declined to comment for this story, just called. He says that there are a few different concepts he is working on for the space, none of which involve a focus on live music. But, he adds, that doesn’t mean he will phase out music completely. Still, I wouldn’t expect this or this or thisand certainly not any of this, which is kind of the point.
UPDATE #2 10/24 2 p.m.: (Current) Tritone owner Dave Rogers says that since I posted this article, he’s already received a dozen calls and emails from bands wondering if their gigs are canceled. The answer is no. Rogers says he expects to be open for at least 3 more months and that any shows currently on the calendar are staying there. Now if people would just comment on-the-record before an article is posted…

TRITONE CLOSING, so sorry to see you go!

story via foobooz:

The local music scene got a bit of bad news over the weekend when word began trickling out that Tritone, the small music venue/neighborhood bar at 1508 South Street, was set to close. The club debuted in 2001, when current owner Dave Rogers (a veteran of Fergie’s), and his late partner, music promoter and bartender Rick Dombrowolski (who understandably went by “Rick D.”), joined forces. While a bartender at neighboring Bob & Barbara’s, Dombrowolski, who died of a heart attack in 2007, invented what has become known throughout the city as the “Citywide Special,” a can of Pabst and a shot of Jim Beam for $3.

The bar is the last of its kind. While it can be difficult for a new band to get a foot in the door at Philadelphia’s other music venues, Tritone has always had a much more open-stage policy. This resulted in a vast array of live music. From death metal to punk to singer-songwriter to hip-hop, Tritone presented it all, seven nights a week.

In my former life as a sometimes concert producer, I had the pleasure of putting together a few shows there, including an on-the-cusp Gogol Bordello, Living Color guitarist Vernon Reid, and Tune Yards mastermind Merrill Garbus, back when she was known as Fat Kid Opera. Other great performances I have seen there: Man Man, West Philadelphia Orchestra, She Haw, the Sun Ra Arkestra, Undergirl, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey and Beretta 76, just to name a few. It was also the place where I had my first deep fried pickle, not to mention my first (and last) hit of acid.

The place usually smelled like stale beer, the sound was almost always way too loud, the door guy could be a real prick, and 10 p.m. shows would start at 11 p.m or later. But when it worked, it worked, and you walked away drunk at 2 a.m. with the feeling that you had one up on all those folks who were in bed by midnight and missed the show.

No one at the bar will talk about the impending closure, but I have it on good authority that Chris and Heather Fetfatzes, who own South Philadelphia’s Hawthornes Cafe (Chris’ family owns Bella Vista Beer Distributors), have entered into an agreement of sale with Rogers, pending approval of the liquor license transfer. Expect to see one of those orange liquor license transfer signs in the window on Tuesday. The Fetfatzeses, who would not comment, are expected to dump a sizable amount of money into the dilapidated space, install draft lines, considerably raise the bar on the food program and discontinue the live music.

No word on the fate of the $3 special.

UPDATE 10/24 1 p.m.: Chris Fetfatzes, who previously declined to comment for this story, just called. He says that there are a few different concepts he is working on for the space, none of which involve a focus on live music. But, he adds, that doesn’t mean he will phase out music completely. Still, I wouldn’t expect this or this or thisand certainly not any of this, which is kind of the point.

UPDATE #2 10/24 2 p.m.: (Current) Tritone owner Dave Rogers says that since I posted this article, he’s already received a dozen calls and emails from bands wondering if their gigs are canceled. The answer is no. Rogers says he expects to be open for at least 3 more months and that any shows currently on the calendar are staying there. Now if people would just comment on-the-record before an article is posted…

 
@keswick_theatre
Cyndi Lauper is playing a show with Dr. John Fri Oct 21st at the Keswick Theatre!
Cyndi has a new album “Memphis Blues” and a whole new sound, check out this review via Slant Magazine:

While spending the better part of two decades off the mainstream radar, pop icon Cyndi Lauper has followed her creative muse across some diverse terrain, resulting in a catalogue that is far richer than those who think of her as just an ’80s relic might expect. With her public profile significantly elevated by a recent stint on The Celebrity Apprentice, on which she often butted heads with the likes of Holly Robinson-Peete and Summer Sanders, it’s a shame that her latest album,Memphis Blues, is one of her weakest efforts.
Lauper’s voice is one the most powerful and distinctive in pop music, and that has served her well on albums like the progressive Sisters of Avalon and 2008’s Bring Ya to the Brink, a years-overdue collection of contemporary dance tracks. ButMemphis Blues proves that Lauper’s is not a voice that is well suited to singing in any style. It isn’t simply a matter of her tar-thick Bronx accent making it impossible for anyone to associate her with the city of the album’s title: Her performances here too often come across as stagey and lack the authority of both the best blues vocalists and of Lauper’s most memorable pop hits.
To make up for the fact that blues music isn’t a natural fit for her, Lauper surrounds herself with some of the genre’s biggest names. Allen Toussaint, Ann Peebles, B.B. King, and Jonny Lang all contribute to the record, and that collaborative approach generally elevates the record. There’s simply no faulting Toussait’s tremendous blues piano licks on “Early in the Mornin’” and “Mother Earth,” easily the two strongest cuts on the record. Charlie Musselwhite’s harmonica playing on “Down Don’t Bother Me” and opener “Just Your Fool” also gives the record a real punch. Of the proper vocal duets, the fierce “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” with Peebles is the most effective, as the timbre of Peebles’s throaty alto is the best complement to Lauper’s trademark warble.
The duets with Lang, however, come across as strident and ineffective. Lauper’s clipped phrasing on a cover of “How Blue Can You Get” is at odds with Lang’s slow-handed guitar riffs and ragged vocal turn, and “Crossroads” is as clichéd as the material on Lang’s last few underwhelming efforts. The tracks on which Lauper flies solo are no less a mixed bag. “Romance in the Dark” is languid and soulful, but it would be a stretch to call Lauper’s performance bluesy in any conventional sense. The boogie-woogie groove on “Don’t Cry No More” is the arrangement that best suits Lauper’s gifts, and it’s easily the song to which she brings the most conviction.
Memphis Blues is a disappointment because it doesn’t play to Lauper’s considerable strengths. She remains a vocalist of phenomenal depth and power, but she sounds lost in this material and in these arrangements. Her out-of-control, sloppy performance of “Just Your Fool” on the finale of Celebrity Apprentice was an unfortunate harbinger. Lauper has deserved a mainstream comeback for some time now, but Memphis Blues is unlikely to be the album to make that happen.

@keswick_theatre

Cyndi Lauper is playing a show with Dr. John Fri Oct 21st at the Keswick Theatre!

Cyndi has a new album “Memphis Blues” and a whole new sound, check out this review via Slant Magazine:



While spending the better part of two decades off the mainstream radar, pop icon Cyndi Lauper has followed her creative muse across some diverse terrain, resulting in a catalogue that is far richer than those who think of her as just an ’80s relic might expect. With her public profile significantly elevated by a recent stint on The Celebrity Apprentice, on which she often butted heads with the likes of Holly Robinson-Peete and Summer Sanders, it’s a shame that her latest album,Memphis Blues, is one of her weakest efforts.

Lauper’s voice is one the most powerful and distinctive in pop music, and that has served her well on albums like the progressive Sisters of Avalon and 2008’s Bring Ya to the Brink, a years-overdue collection of contemporary dance tracks. ButMemphis Blues proves that Lauper’s is not a voice that is well suited to singing in any style. It isn’t simply a matter of her tar-thick Bronx accent making it impossible for anyone to associate her with the city of the album’s title: Her performances here too often come across as stagey and lack the authority of both the best blues vocalists and of Lauper’s most memorable pop hits.

To make up for the fact that blues music isn’t a natural fit for her, Lauper surrounds herself with some of the genre’s biggest names. Allen Toussaint, Ann Peebles, B.B. King, and Jonny Lang all contribute to the record, and that collaborative approach generally elevates the record. There’s simply no faulting Toussait’s tremendous blues piano licks on “Early in the Mornin’” and “Mother Earth,” easily the two strongest cuts on the record. Charlie Musselwhite’s harmonica playing on “Down Don’t Bother Me” and opener “Just Your Fool” also gives the record a real punch. Of the proper vocal duets, the fierce “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” with Peebles is the most effective, as the timbre of Peebles’s throaty alto is the best complement to Lauper’s trademark warble.

The duets with Lang, however, come across as strident and ineffective. Lauper’s clipped phrasing on a cover of “How Blue Can You Get” is at odds with Lang’s slow-handed guitar riffs and ragged vocal turn, and “Crossroads” is as clichéd as the material on Lang’s last few underwhelming efforts. The tracks on which Lauper flies solo are no less a mixed bag. “Romance in the Dark” is languid and soulful, but it would be a stretch to call Lauper’s performance bluesy in any conventional sense. The boogie-woogie groove on “Don’t Cry No More” is the arrangement that best suits Lauper’s gifts, and it’s easily the song to which she brings the most conviction.

Memphis Blues is a disappointment because it doesn’t play to Lauper’s considerable strengths. She remains a vocalist of phenomenal depth and power, but she sounds lost in this material and in these arrangements. Her out-of-control, sloppy performance of “Just Your Fool” on the finale of Celebrity Apprentice was an unfortunate harbinger. Lauper has deserved a mainstream comeback for some time now, but Memphis Blues is unlikely to be the album to make that happen.

*EVENT* Wednesday Oct 12th TROPICALISMO w/ Quantic + Pernett +Juanderful doors open at 10PM 21+ only

@9thwondermusic @murs
HIP HOP LOVE TOUR FEATURING MURS! —> Fri. Oct. 14th at the Fire in PhillYO!!
Also performing: Tabi Bonney, Ski Beats and the Senseis, McKenzie Eddy, Da$h, Sean O’Connell.
BUY TIX
Murs bio via:
Murs (born Nick Carter, March 16, 1978), is an underground MC from Mid-City Los Angeles, CA. The name ‘MURS’ is an acronym for Making Underground Raw Shit. He began to opening eyes as a solo artist in 2002, with the releases of both the full length Def Jux release The End Of The Beginning and the more introspective Varsity Blues EP. He then followed this up by releasing an even more popular and critically acclaimed album together with famous Justus League beatmaker 9th Wonder called Murs 3:16 - The 9th Edition.He has stated that he wishes to work with as many artists as possible in his career to help avoid creative stagnation and this certainly shows in his musical output. Together with his crew, Living Legends he has put out a total of four albums. Then there is the Three Melancholy Gypsys (3MG), a group consisting of three Living Legends members, who have put out two full length releases. His collaboration with Atmosphere’s Slug has so far produced three cd’s, the first of which was a tribute to Christina Ricci whom he also sang softly of on another collaboration - NetherWorlds together with lesser known rappers Anacron and Himself.In 2005 he broadened his horizons by directing an indie film called “Walk Like a Man” with the plot being loosely based on the track by the same name from Murs 3:16 - The 9th Edition. A soundtrack to this movie was also released which besides his own material also featured artists such as Atmosphere, DJ Z-Trip, Blueprint and Brother Ali.

Murs and 9th Wonder - Love the Way

@9thwondermusic @murs

HIP HOP LOVE TOUR FEATURING MURS! —> Fri. Oct. 14th at the Fire in PhillYO!!

Also performing: Tabi Bonney, Ski Beats and the Senseis, McKenzie Eddy, Da$h, Sean O’Connell.

BUY TIX

Murs bio via:

Murs (born Nick Carter, March 16, 1978), is an underground MC from Mid-City Los Angeles, CA. The name ‘MURS’ is an acronym for Making Underground Raw Shit. He began to opening eyes as a solo artist in 2002, with the releases of both the full length Def Jux release The End Of The Beginning and the more introspective Varsity Blues EP. He then followed this up by releasing an even more popular and critically acclaimed album together with famous Justus League beatmaker 9th Wonder called Murs 3:16 - The 9th Edition.

He has stated that he wishes to work with as many artists as possible in his career to help avoid creative stagnation and this certainly shows in his musical output. Together with his crew, Living Legends he has put out a total of four albums. Then there is the Three Melancholy Gypsys (3MG), a group consisting of three Living Legends members, who have put out two full length releases. His collaboration with Atmosphere’s Slug has so far produced three cd’s, the first of which was a tribute to Christina Ricci whom he also sang softly of on another collaboration - NetherWorlds together with lesser known rappers Anacron and Himself.

In 2005 he broadened his horizons by directing an indie film called “Walk Like a Man” with the plot being loosely based on the track by the same name from Murs 3:16 - The 9th Edition. A soundtrack to this movie was also released which besides his own material also featured artists such as AtmosphereDJ Z-TripBlueprint and Brother Ali.

Murs and 9th Wonder - Love the Way

Method Man is playing a show at the Trocadero Theatre on Thurs Oct 13th!
Via Def Jam:
In the dark, womb-like sanctuary of Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady studios in downtown Manhattan—a place that has birthed historical musical moments—sits the artist known as Iron Lung, Tical, Wu Brother #1, Johnny Blaze, and of course…Method Man. With a trusty, half-lit blunt by his side, he is lounging in front of white grand piano, his hands sweeping the keyboards, trying to remember a tune he memorized years ago. Maybe the idea of one of hip hop’s finest—and grimiest—emcees tickling the ivories sounds odd, or out of place, but Mr. Mef has never been the type to fit in. His husky, guttural voice is perhaps the most distinct in the game, his flow—dark and complex like the graphic novels from which he took his moniker from—can bury itself in cinematic tracks from RZA, complement the voices of R&B divas and or attack party tracks from Rocwilder. Whether he is trading verses with partner in rhyme, Redman, crowd surfing at a Wu Tang show, or stealing a scene in various television shows and films, Method Man is a true individual spirit. With his latest album, 4:21, The Day After, he is also focused on being a true artist. Unlike some previous efforts—where Meth admits his priorities were different—on this new album, he says he’s focusing on lyrics. After his last album, Tical O: The Prequel, he went through an especially rough time in his life—both personally and professionally—which provided him with a bulk of material. “I had a lot on my mind at the time and the second thing was, I decided to really talk about something and I had a lot to draw from and when the pen hit the paper it was like damn, remember this? And by the time I was done it was like shit, let’s go.” The result is his most personal and introspective work yet. Doing the work behind the boards on 4:21, are Wu Tang mastermind and long-time collaborator, RZA as well as Scott Storch, Havoc, K1 and Eric Sermon. “With Eric, we did three songs in three days,” Meth says with an amazed smile, “He just comes in with ideas of top. And with RZA, shit, I’ve watched him build tracks from scratch, so all I really have to do is put the pen to the paper”. Eric Sermon provided the beat for Meth’s first single, “Say”, featuring Lauryn Hill. The track finds Meth addressing critics, fickle fans and haters for disrespecting him and his Wu Tang brethren. “I’ve been venting about all this for years and [my manager] was like, ‘Write about it, Eric has the perfect joint.’ And, Lauryn Hill herself, she just had the raw emotion, the small things she said on the song was enough for me to push my pen and let myself be vulnerable.” Meth says his ability to let himself be so open is in line with the entire concept of the album, and its title. “The national weed smoking day is 4/20, so I named my album 4/21 the day after. Because after that day, you have this moment of clarity when you’re not high and you see things clearly.” The Grammy-winner sighs and continues, a serious, determined look on his face. “You feel like you’re not in on the joke, and everyone’s laughing at you. I felt like no one was taking me seriously. I got real angry and I just starting writing.” Anger proved to be a great motivator, as the Ticalion Stallion wrapped up the album in a few short months. He says the creative process has been cathartic, and though his skin hasn’t gotten any thicker, he’s able to use his writing talent to inspire self-confidence. “It’s real talk, I’m going to keep my spirits up and not let it get things to me. You know, if you start reading your own press and feeding into it, and you start questioning yourself, like, ‘am I wack?’ and you have to be like, ‘No!’ I learned to pat myself on the back, and that it’s ok to pat myself on the back sometimes.” We definitely agree.

Method Man is playing a show at the Trocadero Theatre on Thurs Oct 13th!

Via Def Jam:

In the dark, womb-like sanctuary of Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady studios in downtown Manhattan—a place that has birthed historical musical moments—sits the artist known as Iron Lung, Tical, Wu Brother #1, Johnny Blaze, and of course…Method Man. With a trusty, half-lit blunt by his side, he is lounging in front of white grand piano, his hands sweeping the keyboards, trying to remember a tune he memorized years ago. Maybe the idea of one of hip hop’s finest—and grimiest—emcees tickling the ivories sounds odd, or out of place, but Mr. Mef has never been the type to fit in. His husky, guttural voice is perhaps the most distinct in the game, his flow—dark and complex like the graphic novels from which he took his moniker from—can bury itself in cinematic tracks from RZA, complement the voices of R&B divas and or attack party tracks from Rocwilder. Whether he is trading verses with partner in rhyme, Redman, crowd surfing at a Wu Tang show, or stealing a scene in various television shows and films, Method Man is a true individual spirit. With his latest album, 4:21, The Day After, he is also focused on being a true artist. Unlike some previous efforts—where Meth admits his priorities were different—on this new album, he says he’s focusing on lyrics. After his last album, Tical O: The Prequel, he went through an especially rough time in his life—both personally and professionally—which provided him with a bulk of material. “I had a lot on my mind at the time and the second thing was, I decided to really talk about something and I had a lot to draw from and when the pen hit the paper it was like damn, remember this? And by the time I was done it was like shit, let’s go.” The result is his most personal and introspective work yet. Doing the work behind the boards on 4:21, are Wu Tang mastermind and long-time collaborator, RZA as well as Scott Storch, Havoc, K1 and Eric Sermon. “With Eric, we did three songs in three days,” Meth says with an amazed smile, “He just comes in with ideas of top. And with RZA, shit, I’ve watched him build tracks from scratch, so all I really have to do is put the pen to the paper”. Eric Sermon provided the beat for Meth’s first single, “Say”, featuring Lauryn Hill. The track finds Meth addressing critics, fickle fans and haters for disrespecting him and his Wu Tang brethren. “I’ve been venting about all this for years and [my manager] was like, ‘Write about it, Eric has the perfect joint.’ And, Lauryn Hill herself, she just had the raw emotion, the small things she said on the song was enough for me to push my pen and let myself be vulnerable.” Meth says his ability to let himself be so open is in line with the entire concept of the album, and its title. “The national weed smoking day is 4/20, so I named my album 4/21 the day after. Because after that day, you have this moment of clarity when you’re not high and you see things clearly.” The Grammy-winner sighs and continues, a serious, determined look on his face. “You feel like you’re not in on the joke, and everyone’s laughing at you. I felt like no one was taking me seriously. I got real angry and I just starting writing.” Anger proved to be a great motivator, as the Ticalion Stallion wrapped up the album in a few short months. He says the creative process has been cathartic, and though his skin hasn’t gotten any thicker, he’s able to use his writing talent to inspire self-confidence. “It’s real talk, I’m going to keep my spirits up and not let it get things to me. You know, if you start reading your own press and feeding into it, and you start questioning yourself, like, ‘am I wack?’ and you have to be like, ‘No!’ I learned to pat myself on the back, and that it’s ok to pat myself on the back sometimes.” We definitely agree.